Commercial Airline Executive Dashboard – SAS/GRAPH Implementation for BI Contest

July 20th, 2006

Enterprise Dashboard Tag: SAS / GRAPH Dashboards

This just in from Robert Allison, a Dashboard Spy reader who is contributing quite a few enterprise dashboards to our little collection here. Thanks!

Here’s another original/unique dashboard I’d like to submit to your collection.  This one was created to enter into the b-eye-network’s recent contest for question #4 (their “dashboard” question). Here is the website describing the data & question:
http://www.b-eye-network.com/newsletters/data_viz_contest/data_viz.html

They supply an excel spreadsheet with the underlying data and the following scenario:

You are a consultant who has been hired by a U.S. commercial airlines to design a dashboard for its executives. The information that the executive team wants to monitor has been identified and now its your job to create the dashboard’s visual design. You must try to display all of this information in some manner on a single screen such that the executives will be able to quickly identify anything that needs their attention and then have the means to discern enough about the situation to decide if they can ignore it for now or must perhaps take some action. It is up to you to determine the appropriate manner, level of detail, and means to display each piece of information.

Since the contest deadline was last Friday, I guess it’s safe to show this one in public now :) For those of you who want a look behind the scenes of my implementation, here is a link to the interactive web output, and the SAS/Graph code used to create it:

http://robslink.com/SAS/b-eye/beye4.htm
http://robslink.com/SAS/b-eye/beye4.sas

Commercial Airline Executive Dashboard

Homework: If you are new to SAS/GRAPH, of just not sure of what it is, check out these books on SAS/GRAPH.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s books on enterprise dashboards. His current favorite is Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing executive dashboards.

Health Care Clinical Quality and Safety Dashboard – Using enterprise dashboards for hospital performance improvement

July 19th, 2006

By special request from a Dashboard Spy reader interested in using enterprise dashboards in the area of Health Care Clinical Performance Improvements, we present these screenshots from Methodist Medical Center of Illinois, a 330-bed hospital in Peoria. This organization was an early adopter of data dashboards. See this great article on how Methodist’s IT team started developing and implementing data dashboards in 2003, using dashboards to track and improve all dimensions of performance organizationwide, including market breadth and penetration, customer service/patient satisfaction, employee satisfaction, clinical quality and safety, and financial results. Board members, senior executives and physician leaders, service line directors, department or unit managers, and front-line staff review specific data dashboards regularly.

Here is the process improvement process used at the hospital:

Performance Improvement Process

The statement of the formal goals and establishment of the above process was key to the Performance Improvement program. As the article states:

Michael Bryant became Methodist’s CEO in 2000, and he raised the performance bar by setting a goal of being in the top 5% of every performance area. To achieve that goal, it was clear that communication of the goal and the status at the indicator level was a must. Methodist achieved that communication by using a simple stoplight color scheme, which provides clarity for all Methodist dashboards. “Green” indicates excellent work that should be maintained; “yellow” signifies a need for focus because performance is starting to lag; and “red” is an alert, indicating an immediate need for intervention and improvement. “We use these stoplight colors for every dashboard, whether measuring admissions, employee turnover, patient satisfaction, falls, or operating margin,” says Duvendack.

To ensure reliability and validity of data collection and analysis, dashboards should have rules that govern their development and implementation. “Behind the scene of any data dashboard is a strict set of definitions for indicator numerators and denominators, how measures are calculated, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and other parameters,” says Duvendack. “Consistency of dashboard construction and indicator calculations is critical, so a limited number of trained individuals at Methodist are responsible for working with the data that populate the clinical dashboards.”

In addition, because timeliness of the data is critical to effective response, rapid turnover of charts for abstraction is required. Clinical abstracters at Methodist review charts as soon as possible, generally no more than a few weeks after a patient is discharged. “In order to provide meaningful input to quality improvement efforts, the data cannot lag too far behind the care received,” says Duvendack. Data from chart abstraction are entered into the database. The PI department disseminates the dashboards weekly.

These are the bi-weekly hospital-wide dashboards used to enable the performance improvements in the hospital. I apologize for the low quality of the dashboard screenshots. This is the data the Heart Failure Care team uses. The PI staff releases unit-based disease-specific dashboards weekly. Front-line staff and all members of the disease-specific teams in the appropriate clinical units receive the dashboards via e-mail and other means. “We distribute report copies at team meetings and post the dashboards on PI boards, in bathrooms, and every other venue we can use to get the word out. Staff is very familiar with the dashboards,” says Duvendack.

data dashboard

This is the unit specific dashboard. Service line directors, physician partners, and core teams review the reports during weekly meetings, and teams identify “outlier” indicators that require focus. Weekly dashboards may not include all the cases because data are added on a “rolling forward” basis, but by the end of the month, all cases are included in the monthly report

Data Dashboards

Homework: For background on this please look at these books on clinical improvement. And if you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

Health Care Clinical Quality and Safety Dashboard – Using enterprise dashboards for hospital performance improvement

July 19th, 2006

By special request from a Dashboard Spy reader interested in using enterprise dashboards in the area of Health Care Clinical Performance Improvements, we present these screenshots from Methodist Medical Center of Illinois, a 330-bed hospital in Peoria. This organization was an early adopter of data dashboards. See this great article on how Methodist’s IT team started developing and implementing data dashboards in 2003, using dashboards to track and improve all dimensions of performance organizationwide, including market breadth and penetration, customer service/patient satisfaction, employee satisfaction, clinical quality and safety, and financial results. Board members, senior executives and physician leaders, service line directors, department or unit managers, and front-line staff review specific data dashboards regularly.

Here is the process improvement process used at the hospital:

Performance Improvement Process

The statement of the formal goals and establishment of the above process was key to the Performance Improvement program. As the article states:

Michael Bryant became Methodist’s CEO in 2000, and he raised the performance bar by setting a goal of being in the top 5% of every performance area. To achieve that goal, it was clear that communication of the goal and the status at the indicator level was a must. Methodist achieved that communication by using a simple stoplight color scheme, which provides clarity for all Methodist dashboards. “Green” indicates excellent work that should be maintained; “yellow” signifies a need for focus because performance is starting to lag; and “red” is an alert, indicating an immediate need for intervention and improvement. “We use these stoplight colors for every dashboard, whether measuring admissions, employee turnover, patient satisfaction, falls, or operating margin,” says Duvendack.

To ensure reliability and validity of data collection and analysis, dashboards should have rules that govern their development and implementation. “Behind the scene of any data dashboard is a strict set of definitions for indicator numerators and denominators, how measures are calculated, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and other parameters,” says Duvendack. “Consistency of dashboard construction and indicator calculations is critical, so a limited number of trained individuals at Methodist are responsible for working with the data that populate the clinical dashboards.”

In addition, because timeliness of the data is critical to effective response, rapid turnover of charts for abstraction is required. Clinical abstracters at Methodist review charts as soon as possible, generally no more than a few weeks after a patient is discharged. “In order to provide meaningful input to quality improvement efforts, the data cannot lag too far behind the care received,” says Duvendack. Data from chart abstraction are entered into the database. The PI department disseminates the dashboards weekly.

These are the bi-weekly hospital-wide dashboards used to enable the performance improvements in the hospital. I apologize for the low quality of the dashboard screenshots. This is the data the Heart Failure Care team uses. The PI staff releases unit-based disease-specific dashboards weekly. Front-line staff and all members of the disease-specific teams in the appropriate clinical units receive the dashboards via e-mail and other means. “We distribute report copies at team meetings and post the dashboards on PI boards, in bathrooms, and every other venue we can use to get the word out. Staff is very familiar with the dashboards,” says Duvendack.

data dashboard

This is the unit specific dashboard. Service line directors, physician partners, and core teams review the reports during weekly meetings, and teams identify “outlier” indicators that require focus. Weekly dashboards may not include all the cases because data are added on a “rolling forward” basis, but by the end of the month, all cases are included in the monthly report

Data Dashboards

Homework: For background on this please look at these books on clinical improvement. And if you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

MIS Cockpit Enterprise Dashboard – Putting Excel on steroids with Palo, an open source business intelligence tool

July 17th, 2006

Thanks to a tip from a Dashboard Spy reader, I’ve been checking out the Palo open source tool at www.palo.net. The product is an open source business intelligence tool that works in conjunction with Microsoft Excel. It is basically a data store for Excel that permits incredibly huge amounts of data in a small number of worksheets.

Here are a couple of dashboard screenshots. The first shows the MIS Cockpit which is a demo application you can download and try. According to the site: “The application only consists of five Palo enabled screens. But these screens hold as much data as thousands of conventional Excel worksheets.”

MIS Enterprise Dashboard

This next screenshot shows a sales analysis dashboard using the palo product:

Excel Sales Dashboard

Homework: Getting into enterprise dashboarding with Excel? Review charting with this book: Excel Charts for Dummies. If you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

Update: Here is a thought provoking by enterprise dashboard guru Malik, author of the above book. In his intro, he defines dashboards like so:

The term dashboard brings to mind that panel under the windshield of a vehicle that contains indicator dials, various compartments, and control instruments. Its beauty lies in its functionality. It brings together all of the relevant data and functions within easy accessibility to the driver. It allows us to monitor important, even lifesaving data while performing the vital day-to-day task of driving. In addition, it provides an ease of use and comfort so as to make the multitude of decisions necessary during the driving task almost automatic, and certainly effortless.
 

For corporate decision makers, the amount of data that must be monitored and analyzed on a given business day is anything but effortless. Hunting through spreadsheets, calling in elite information specialists, and experiencing costly delays in the synthesis process—managing information is becoming more complicated by the day. Certainly, the time has come for a new vision of the dashboard that will meet the needs of today’s business professionals.
 

The term dashboard has acquired a vibrant new meaning in the field of information management as leading organizations worldwide embrace the idea of empowerment through improved real-time information systems. In the current corporate vocabulary, a dashboard is a rich computer interface with charts, reports, visual indicators, and alert mechanisms that are consolidated into a dynamic and relevant information platform.  

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

MIS Cockpit Enterprise Dashboard – Putting Excel on steroids with Palo, an open source business intelligence tool

July 17th, 2006

Thanks to a tip from a Dashboard Spy reader, I’ve been checking out the Palo open source tool at www.palo.net. The product is an open source business intelligence tool that works in conjunction with Microsoft Excel. It is basically a data store for Excel that permits incredibly huge amounts of data in a small number of worksheets.

Here are a couple of dashboard screenshots. The first shows the MIS Cockpit which is a demo application you can download and try. According to the site: “The application only consists of five Palo enabled screens. But these screens hold as much data as thousands of conventional Excel worksheets.”

MIS Enterprise Dashboard

This next screenshot shows a sales analysis dashboard using the palo product:

Excel Sales Dashboard

Homework: Getting into enterprise dashboarding with Excel? Review charting with this book: Excel Charts for Dummies. If you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

Update: Here is a thought provoking by enterprise dashboard guru Malik, author of the above book. In his intro, he defines dashboards like so:

The term dashboard brings to mind that panel under the windshield of a vehicle that contains indicator dials, various compartments, and control instruments. Its beauty lies in its functionality. It brings together all of the relevant data and functions within easy accessibility to the driver. It allows us to monitor important, even lifesaving data while performing the vital day-to-day task of driving. In addition, it provides an ease of use and comfort so as to make the multitude of decisions necessary during the driving task almost automatic, and certainly effortless.
 

For corporate decision makers, the amount of data that must be monitored and analyzed on a given business day is anything but effortless. Hunting through spreadsheets, calling in elite information specialists, and experiencing costly delays in the synthesis process—managing information is becoming more complicated by the day. Certainly, the time has come for a new vision of the dashboard that will meet the needs of today’s business professionals.
 

The term dashboard has acquired a vibrant new meaning in the field of information management as leading organizations worldwide embrace the idea of empowerment through improved real-time information systems. In the current corporate vocabulary, a dashboard is a rich computer interface with charts, reports, visual indicators, and alert mechanisms that are consolidated into a dynamic and relevant information platform.  

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

Sales and Marketing Enterprise Dashboard – tracking pipeline KPIs

July 17th, 2006

Sales Dashboard Example:

Here is a sales pipeline dashboard packed with plenty of sales and marketing KPIs to study. The info on the underlying product is located at http://www.azerity.com/products_azerity_dashboard.htm. The focus of this example is on the world of sales. There are lots of sales, marketing and sales pipeline metrics presented. Different dashboard views can be selected via a dropdown control.

The first screenshot shows an overall sales dashboard view with emphasis on the sales pipeline. Graphs are presented in portlets with dropdown filtering underneath each one. A simple graphic is shown for each KPI with the underlying data accessible via a link. The top row features Top Customers, Sales Revenue and Top Markets Sales Trend. The second row looks at pricing pressures and win/loss ratios. The bottom of the page features the sales pipeline.

Sales metrics dashboard

Here is the Sales Pipeline Projection KPI dashboard. The KPIs are presented by close date, by organization and by market segment.

Sales Pipeline Project Enterprise Dashboard

This is chart detailing the trend in the margin percentage that the company is making. A good way to focus sales attention in the areas that really pay off.

Margin Metrics Dashboard

Finally, you know I like to see how the dashboard views can be configured  by the users. Here is how the charts can be customized.

Customizing enterprise dashboards

Tags: Sales Pipeline Dashboard, Marketing Dashboards, Sales Dashboards

Homework: Trying to understand what is behind sales pipeline management? You must take a look at Sales Forecasting Management: Understanding the Techniques, Systems and Management of the Sales Forecasting Process.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

If you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

Sales and Marketing Enterprise Dashboard – tracking pipeline KPIs

July 17th, 2006

Sales Dashboard Example:

Here is a sales pipeline dashboard packed with plenty of sales and marketing KPIs to study. The info on the underlying product is located at http://www.azerity.com/products_azerity_dashboard.htm. The focus of this example is on the world of sales. There are lots of sales, marketing and sales pipeline metrics presented. Different dashboard views can be selected via a dropdown control.

The first screenshot shows an overall sales dashboard view with emphasis on the sales pipeline. Graphs are presented in portlets with dropdown filtering underneath each one. A simple graphic is shown for each KPI with the underlying data accessible via a link. The top row features Top Customers, Sales Revenue and Top Markets Sales Trend. The second row looks at pricing pressures and win/loss ratios. The bottom of the page features the sales pipeline.

Sales metrics dashboard

Here is the Sales Pipeline Projection KPI dashboard. The KPIs are presented by close date, by organization and by market segment.

Sales Pipeline Project Enterprise Dashboard

This is chart detailing the trend in the margin percentage that the company is making. A good way to focus sales attention in the areas that really pay off.

Margin Metrics Dashboard

Finally, you know I like to see how the dashboard views can be configured  by the users. Here is how the charts can be customized.

Customizing enterprise dashboards

Tags: Sales Pipeline Dashboard, Marketing Dashboards, Sales Dashboards

Homework: Trying to understand what is behind sales pipeline management? You must take a look at Sales Forecasting Management: Understanding the Techniques, Systems and Management of the Sales Forecasting Process.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

If you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

Casino Management Enterprise Dashboard – KPIs for regulatory compliance of slots revenue

July 14th, 2006

Today’s enterprise dashboard is from a bit off the beaten path. But then again, that’s how we really learn best, isn’t it? By examining how dashboarding can be used in far flung industries, we can tease out the universal enterprise dashboard best practices that can make our application a better dashboard. This dashboard focuses on scrutinizing revenue trends and tracking financial KPIs and metrics for management of a gaming operation.

A Dashboard Spy looking into the challenges of maximizing slot machine revenue at an indian reservation casino reports in with these screenshots of enterprise dashboards dedicated to tracking gaming machine KPIs. Did you know that slots account for more than half of a typical casino’s revenue? The key factor is the gross revenue (or the “drop”) of these machines. Statistics are carefully kept down to the individual machine as these dashboard screenshots show. If you didn’t realize, this proves that it’s all about optimizing the total drop by carefully manipulating every element in the casino. This starts with the exact placement of every machine. These screenshots show gaming machine moves, destroys and sells.

The last screen shows the revenue of a certain slot machine. My question is when is the money actually counted for these statistics? A big concern in the industry is “skimming the drop”, that is, employees taking money out of the machines – usually the coins are diverted before the count room is reached. Does the technology exist to have the machines networked to report in real time the money received? That way, skimming is shown instantly with the discrepancy between the machine’s report and the actual counting room report. Shouldn’t this be straight forward?

Here is an interesting article regarding slot fraud from a 1991 CPA Journal article, “Control Testing in the Gaming Industry“.

Slot Machine Dashboard

Casino Management Enterprise Dashboard

Gaming Machine Revenue Dashboard

Homework: Casino management is a very interesting topic. Take a look at these books on casino management. And if you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

An excerpt from the Malik book for you to study. It has to do with the all important requirements gathering phase of a dashboard project. Storyboarding, wireframing and mockups – whatever technique you use to visualize dashboard requirements, it is a critical effort.

Storyboarding brings together all key areas of the dashboarding process that have been discussed so far: meta-information, audience, presentation,and alerts. The following steps may be followed through a dashboard story-boarding exercise:

1. Identify key user groupings

2. Identify key dashboard groupings

3. Determine the privilege matrix: user groups and dashboard groups

4. Sketch a dashboard layout for each dashboard group

5. Sketch a navigation sequence for each dashboard component on every dashboard template

Note that storyboarding is a high-level exercise that does not delve into thenitty-gritty of how and where to get the information. During this step, it is simply assumed that any information required for the dashboard display can be retrieved from the information biosphere of the organization.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

Casino Management Enterprise Dashboard – KPIs for regulatory compliance of slots revenue

July 14th, 2006

Today’s enterprise dashboard is from a bit off the beaten path. But then again, that’s how we really learn best, isn’t it? By examining how dashboarding can be used in far flung industries, we can tease out the universal enterprise dashboard best practices that can make our application a better dashboard. This dashboard focuses on scrutinizing revenue trends and tracking financial KPIs and metrics for management of a gaming operation.

A Dashboard Spy looking into the challenges of maximizing slot machine revenue at an indian reservation casino reports in with these screenshots of enterprise dashboards dedicated to tracking gaming machine KPIs. Did you know that slots account for more than half of a typical casino’s revenue? The key factor is the gross revenue (or the “drop”) of these machines. Statistics are carefully kept down to the individual machine as these dashboard screenshots show. If you didn’t realize, this proves that it’s all about optimizing the total drop by carefully manipulating every element in the casino. This starts with the exact placement of every machine. These screenshots show gaming machine moves, destroys and sells.

The last screen shows the revenue of a certain slot machine. My question is when is the money actually counted for these statistics? A big concern in the industry is “skimming the drop”, that is, employees taking money out of the machines – usually the coins are diverted before the count room is reached. Does the technology exist to have the machines networked to report in real time the money received? That way, skimming is shown instantly with the discrepancy between the machine’s report and the actual counting room report. Shouldn’t this be straight forward?

Here is an interesting article regarding slot fraud from a 1991 CPA Journal article, “Control Testing in the Gaming Industry“.

Slot Machine Dashboard

Casino Management Enterprise Dashboard

Gaming Machine Revenue Dashboard

Homework: Casino management is a very interesting topic. Take a look at these books on casino management. And if you are on an enterprise dashboard project, do yourself a favor and take a look at Enterprise Dashboards: Design and Best Practices for IT, the only book on actually implementing enterprise dashboards.

An excerpt from the Malik book for you to study. It has to do with the all important requirements gathering phase of a dashboard project. Storyboarding, wireframing and mockups – whatever technique you use to visualize dashboard requirements, it is a critical effort.

Storyboarding brings together all key areas of the dashboarding process that have been discussed so far: meta-information, audience, presentation,and alerts. The following steps may be followed through a dashboard story-boarding exercise:

1. Identify key user groupings

2. Identify key dashboard groupings

3. Determine the privilege matrix: user groups and dashboard groups

4. Sketch a dashboard layout for each dashboard group

5. Sketch a navigation sequence for each dashboard component on every dashboard template

Note that storyboarding is a high-level exercise that does not delve into thenitty-gritty of how and where to get the information. During this step, it is simply assumed that any information required for the dashboard display can be retrieved from the information biosphere of the organization.

So what or who is The Dashboard Spy? As his about page states, The Dashboard Spy is just a guy interested in the design of enterprise dashboards. He could not find any executive dashboard design source books (or even screenshots of real business dashboards) and so set about creating his own. Finally convinced to post his extensive collection of dashboard screenshots online, he was amazed to find how popular it has become. If you have a nice screenshot of a digital dashboard, balanced scorecard, or any business intelligence graphic to share, please send an email to info _at_ dashboardspy.com. Also check out The Dashboard Spy’s favorite books on business dashboards.

User Configurable Service Desk Operational Metrics Dashboard – letting users create their own dashboard queries

July 13th, 2006

Enterprise Dashboard fans, I’m just updating this old post because it came up in a recent discussion of design patterns used to let dashboard users configure their views and preferences. This dashboard example is particulary nice in how it affords the user a lot of customization in choosing their data. The drawback is that for less sophisticated users, it may get them into trouble. Oh, well, I suppose there’s always the dashboard help desk! Read the rest of this entry »